What Advantages Did the North Have Over the South in the.

This meant that the south had better soldiers in the beginning of the war, because they had grown accustomed to outdoor life.Due to the many advantages and disadvantages between the two regions, the Civil War was indeed an extremely hard war to win. The North and South battled for four years, which lead to many deaths. The amount of industrialization the North had eventually put them ahead.

Disadvantages the south had in the civil war? Top Answer. Wiki User. 2011-02-08 01:11:50 2011-02-08 01:11:50. 1. Most of the factories manufacturing products during the Civil War were located in.

North vs. South - The Civil War.

Civil War Technology, North vs South: Telegram. One of the most important technologies of the civil war was the telegram. It completly changed the outcome of the war. When Abraham Lincoln was born the telegram hadn't even been invented. So when he embraced this new technology it changed everything. Abraham Lincoln quickly went from a figurehead, to a fulfledged battle leader. He directed his.The American Civil War was partly instigated over economic, political and social differences between the Southern and Northern United States. Each side had certain advantages over the other, and.North vs South during the Civil war. The North and the South increasingly grew different during the first part of the 1800s, eventually culminating into a war that started around 1861. While Northern cities became centers of wealth and manufacturing and attracted skilled workers, it wasn’t the case in the South.


Strategies, Advantages, and Disadvantages for the North and South Strategies - Expert Information: To achieve victory in any war both sides must devise a plan or strategy to win. In the summer of 1861, the armies of both the North (th e Billy Yanks) and the South (J ohnny Rebs) marched off to war. Leaders for both sides created a plan for victory. Fighting during the Civil War took place on.If you were to list the advantages of the North side by side with those of the South, you might wonder how the Civil War continued for four long years. In sheer numbers the North had more of everything. They had more people, more guns, and more money. Why, then, did the Union not achieve a quick victory? This question will be answered after the strengths of both sides are pointed out. The.

The North started the Civil War with big advantages over the South, especially in terms of manufacturing power, food supplies, and number of people. Rail networks of more than 22,000 miles carried shipments of food and equipment from farms to cities. Twenty million people, more than a fifth of them recent immigrants, provided a large pool of soldiers and of workers for farms and factories. In.

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The Role of Cotton in the Civil War. BY Brita Voris. In the 1800s, the relationship between the American South and cotton was a strong and profitable one. Leading up to the Civil War, the cotton industry was the greatest contributor to the Southern economy. Because the world largely depended on the South for its supply of cotton, the country was able to borrow money around the world. The.

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Probably the South had more advantages at the beginning of the Civil War. Perhaps if the South had followed the plan advocated by General Albert Sidney Johnson, the South would have won the Civil War.

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The advantages enjoyed by the North at the start of the American Civil War should have pointed toward a short confrontation, in line with General Winfield Scott’s initial estimation. Even a worried but confident Abraham Lincoln perceived his response as a “police action” designed to bring the recalcitrant states back in the Union. Yet is was the immense advantages of the North that.

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The South had no possibility of winning the war; rather its advantages allowed it to prolong the war which otherwise would have ended much more quickly. Further Reading.

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Slave ownership became a fiery national issue and eventually led to the Civil War. It was only a matter of chance that Whitney became involved with cotton growing. After graduating from Yale University in 1792 with hopes of becoming a lawyer, he traveled to South Carolina to accept a job as a tutor.

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At the beginning of the Civil War, 22 million people lived in the North and 9 million people (nearly 4 million of whom were slaves) lived in the South. The North also had more money, more factories, more horses, more railroads, and more farmland. On paper, these advantages made the United States much more powerful than the Confederate States. However, the Confederates were fighting defensively.

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Most of the fighting during the American Civil War took place on Southern soil. In part, this was the result of the war strategies of both sides. To win the war, the South had only to survive. On the other hand, for the North to win, the Union had to be restored. Thus, Union forces had to conquer the South in order to win the war. War action around their homes created many hardships for.

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While the defeat at Gettysburg is cited as the reason why the South lost the war, many arguments are provided as to why the Confederates lost that battle. Some have blamed Robert E. Lee for mismanaging his army. Others blame Jeb Stuart for riding off on a raid and so leaving Lee blind to enemy maneuvers. While these explanations focus on southern failures; there is another view. As George.

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The Civil War was a series of battles between the North and the South over issues such as slavery and states' rights. When Lincoln, who opposed slavery, was elected president, this caused conflict with the South, who viewed slavery as a way of life. This difference tore the nation in two; the Confederacy, consisting of mostly southern states, and the Union which was mostly northern states.

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